Communicating Knowledge for Sustainable Rangeland Management under Climate Change – Improving Analytic and Reporting Skills 2018

UNU-LRT is a training programme on restoration of degraded land and sustainable land management

Communicating Knowledge for Sustainable Rangeland Management under Climate Change – Improving Analytic and Reporting Skills 2018


Year

2018 (7 days)

Location

Mongolia

Participants Men Women Total
Mongolia 7 17 24

UNU Representatives

  • Kristin Svavarsdottir
  • Isabel C Barrio
  • Berglind Orradottir

General topics

  • Current knowledge of ecosystems, climate change, grazing and rangelands – globally and in Mongolia
  • Land literacy: land condition and the role of management in maintaining and improving ecosystem health and resilience
  • The basic framework for project planning

Partners

  • Mongolian University of Life Sciences (MULS)
  • National Federation of Pasture User Groups of Herders (NFPUG)
  • Information and Research Institute of Meteorology, Hydrology and Environment (IRIMHE)

Target group

Professionals from government agencies involved in data collection and processing and responsible for informing policy makers about sustainable land management, as well as lecturers teaching about those issues


Description

Grazing is a traditional land use in Mongolia. The design of effective management plans requires an understanding of how changes in grazing pressure affect land conditions in combination with ongoing climate change. Mongolia has an unparalleled monitoring programme on rangeland health. A wealth of data is collected every year in a systematic way, at many sites throughout this vast country. The high-quality data collected provides opportunities to address the effects of grazing and climate change, so that this knowledge can be translated into effective policy making for sustainable rangeland use. However, to make informed management decisions it is critical to understand the limitations of the available data, the potential confounding factors and the possibilities for analyses. Enhancing analytic and reporting skills will thus enable an efficient use of the data already available and allow the design of studies to address specific questions. 

The short course “Communicating Knowledge for Sustainable Rangeland Management under Climate Change – Improving Analytic and Reporting Skills” addressed these issues. The aim of the course was to increase the ability of the participants to:
1) distinguish between the effect of grazing and climate change on ecosystems, and enhance their skills for designing research and monitoring projects that increase knowledge of ecosystems, and
2) recognize good quality data and information, and use them to inform policy makers concerning sustainable management of ecosystems under ongoing climate change. 

The course started with two days of interactive lectures, followed by a field trip where participants explored grazing and climate change impacts at two steppe sites, a pine forest and a riparian area. During the field visit, participants reflected on the concepts and topics covered during the lectures. In the latter part of the course the focus was on the basic project framework, where the rangeland health monitoring system in Mongolia was used as a case study to explain the different elements of the framework. In this part of the course the participants were assigned to working groups, where they explored the different components of the basic project framework. 

The course was held in Mongolia from 29 June to 5 July 2018. The seven-day course was jointly developed by UNU-LRT and three of its partner institutions in Mongolia:

  • Mongolian University of Life Sciences (MULS)
  • National Federation of Pasture User Groups of Herders (NFPUG)
  • Information and Research Institute of Meteorology, Hydrology and Environment (IRIMHE).

Former fellows

Division

UNU-LRT

AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY OF ICELAND
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